Assessments

All assessments are due to be submitted to the i-Centre by 2pm on Monday 8th May 2017

The Logbook

All work on tasks and presentations as well as documentation of your projects should be collected together into a Logbook. You can optionall include a physical copy of the logbook, but an electronic verision must be submitted.

The logbook is worth 50% of your total mark.

The logbook should include:

  • A week by week log of your work and activities. It is recommended that you maintain your logbook each week during the lab session.
  • photographs and videos of each task, including screenshots of any code that you have used
  • a written description of aims, intentions and outcomes
  • a critical evaluation of compositions and patches. You should reference other examples and practitioners in the field to contextualise your work in the light of others’ work.
  • You may use up to 2000 words (~1000 words tasks, ~1000 words critical reflection). You can use the voice-over element of screen casts to augment your verbal submission without exceeding the word limit.

The logbook can be compiled using any word processing software, including Google Docs.  When complete, save to pdf. Refer to submitted movies from within the logbook, but include the movies separately in the submission. Images can, of course, be included in the logbook.

  • There is an absolute limit of 700MB data per submission. Submissions which include more than this amount of data will lost 5% of marks per 50MB exceeded. So, a 750MB submission would lose 5%, an 850MB submission 15%;
  • All documentation must be submitted in electronic versions.
  • A recorded version of your composition/performance;
  • Guidelines on how to use the item (these should be checked with a colleague to ensure that they are properly usable). Please include photographs/videos of the item in operation, including any software or firmware developed.
  • Please see this document for detailed information.
  • All assignments should be submitted to the i-centre by 2pm on Monday 8th May 2017
  • For information about the presentation, please see below or this document.
  • Tom’s page about logbooks

Deductions

The 50% weighting for the Individual Project includes the following potential deductions:

  • 10% for non-performance without good reason (so, should your submission receive 60% you will receive a mark of 50%.
  • 10% for non-submission of a recorded version of your performance
  • Failure to submit either of the above may result in failure of the module
  • 10% for submission of poorly presented documentation.
  • See above for deductions for submission of too much data.


The Tasks

http://rhoadley.net/courses/cbhh/#task_summary

1 – w2 Cable : Make your own cable w2 logbook (50%)
2 – w2 Laying on of Hands and Hacking the Clock : Initial investigations of your toy… w2 logbook (50%)
3 – w3 Amplifier : Amplify your toy w3 logbook (50%)
4 – w3 Synthesis on a chip : Synthesise sounds on a simple chip w3 logbook (50%)
5 – w4 Sudomini : Make a Sudomini w4 logbook (50%)
6 – w4 Make a mike : Make your own electret microphone w4 logbook (50%)
7 – w5 Capacitative Touch Sensor : Make your own capacitative touch sensor w5 logbook (50%)
8 – w5 Boxing : Boxing and Rebuilding w5 logbook (50%)
9 “Hello world!” w7 logbook (50%)
10 Vibrating a piezo w8 logbook (50%)
11 Connecting the Arduino, MaxMSP and SuperCollider w9 logbook (50%)
12 Mapping w9 logbook (50%)

Presentation (weeks 6 and 7)

You should investigate other recent developments in interface design.  New Interfaces for Musical Expression (NIME) is one of the most interesting sources for this. Look at the internet site, noting that the proceedings of the last three or four years’ conferences are on-line. Look through these papers (there are many of them) and choose one that appeals to you. Prepare a short presentation on why the approach you’ve chosen appeals to you. Although you don’t have to prepare a formal presentation, making sure you can display the paper (via the data projector provided) in addition to any images, videos or recordings normally makes things much more interesting. Try to have a look at what others are going to talk about if you can.  NIME is a good place to look, but you don’t have to use one of those papers. You can also look over the proceedings for ICMC (International Computer Music Conference) and check out the activities at organisations like Steim.  However, if you don’t please clear the paper/subject you choose with your tutor to begin with.

The presentation itself will not receive a mark, but you will receive a 5% penalty from the entire module should you not present, (so, if you end up with 58%, you will actually get 53%). While you do not need to write an essay, you should submit the information you have included in your presentations in the logbook, including links to documents, images, videos and web pages as well as a summary of your arguments and conclusions.

A few ideas about the presentation itself:

1. If you use slides in your presentation don’t use too many words on each slide; make sure everyone can read them.
2. Show a live demo if at all possible.
3. Try to avoid reading things out: use notes and bullet points to guide your thoughts.
4. Try to involve others – have questions prepared to ask
5. Say why you’re interested in your subject, but also try to be critical.
6. Download Youtube videos if possible to avoid difficulties with online access.
7. Include context


Individual Circuit Bending Project (25%, week 8)

Choose some aspect covered during the course to concentrate on and complete a creative project to be performed towards the end of the course.  Remember your performance itself is not evaluated: only your devices and the music you make with them.

The 25% weighting for the Individual Circuit Bending Project includes the following potential deductions:

  • 10% for non-performance without good reason (so, should your submission receive 60% you will receive a mark of 50%.
  • 10% for non-submission of a recorded version of your performance
  • 10% for submission of poorly presented documentation.
  • Failure to submit either of the above will result in failure of the module
  • See above for deductions for submission of too much data.

Individual Arduino Project (25%, week 12)

Choose some aspect covered during the course to concentrate on and complete a creative project for performance towards the end of the course.

The 25% weighting for the Individual Arduino Project includes the following potential deductions:

  • 10% for non-performance without good reason (so, should your submission receive 60% you will receive a mark of 50%.
  • 10% for non-submission of a recorded version of your performance
  • 10% for submission of poorly presented documentation.
  • Failure to submit either of the above will result in failure of the module
  • See above for deductions for submission of too much data.

Class Participation

Please plan to attend all classes and arrive on time. Please be courteous to the collegial community we are creating this semester by not conversing with others during class lectures; be mindful during the labs that this is time is designed to give you guided practice with some of the tools you will need in order to complete your assignments.

Participation means being an active member of the dialogue. It consists of doing one or more of the following: being prepared for class and writing comments in your logbooks and in the Facebook group, by making observations about the readings and exercises, by asking questions, by staying on topic. In classs, taking notes, actively working on in-class exercises instead of unrelated activities like email, chat and general web surfing, and actively listening lends to better discussion.

Unexpected problems happen (serious illness, etc.), it is important to let me know so we can make appropriate changes to your schedule. If you will miss class for whatever reason, let me know as soon as possible so we can make alternative arrangements for this as well.